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Mobile Technology News, August 31, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

  • Tokyo court deals win for Samsung
    A court in Tokyo rules that Samsung Electronics did not infringe on patents held by Apple, a victory for the South Korean company.
  • FinSpy Software Is Tracking Political Dissidents
    Two researchers say an off-the-shelf computer program has been used to monitor and spy on dissidents in countries around the world.

  • Advertising: TV Guide Goes From Coffee Table to the Tablet
    TV Guide’s mobile app connects users with their favorite shows, and gives advertisers a way to connect with viewers.

  • Some vendors wary of Windows RT
    Not all is copacetic in Windows RT land.
  • Possible ‘iPad Mini’ Spotted in iOS App Developer Logs
    Instapaper developer Marco Arment has spotted two new iPad device codes in his logs that he believes represents the long rumored “iPad mini”.

    The new identifiers found were “iPad2,5″ and “iPad2,6″. As Arment notes, the iPad2,1 through iPad 2,3 designations are known to represent the iPad 2′s WiFi, GSM and CDMA models. The iPad2,4 represents a die-shrunk/cheaper version of the iPad 2 that was released alongside the 3rd generation iPad. Finally, the 3rd Generation iPad carries a designation of iPad3,x.



    iPad Mini mockup (left) by iMore

    As for “iPad2,5″ and “iPad2,6″, they have not been seen before, but Arment concludes they are likely to be the long rumored ‘iPad mini’ which is based on iPad 2 hardware.

    The much more likely explanation is that iPad2,5 and iPad2,6 are the new “iPad Mini” in Wi-Fi and GSM, and I haven’t recorded the likely iPad2,7 CDMA version yet.

    If so, this suggests that the iPad Mini is, effectively, an iPad 2: an A5 with 512 MB of RAM and enough GPU power to drive the Gruber Display, but not a Retina Display.

    It’s a textbook Tim Cook supply-chain move: selling the last generation’s hardware at a lower price point to expand marketshare.

    By “Gruber Display”, Arment refers to John Gruber’s speculation that a iPad Mini made sense as a 7.85″ display that shares the same resolution as the original iPad (1024×768). Arment goes into a little further depth in his blog post about his speculation on the internals of the iPad mini.

    Apple is believed to be launching a smaller 7.85″ iPad in the coming months. Rumors have suggested we’ll see it launched as early as October.


  • Apple Adds ‘Chomp’ Styled App Store Search Results and More in iOS 6
    Apple has quietly made some changes to iOS 6′s App Store app formatting tonight and introduced a new search results format that seem clearly inspired by Chomp.

    Chomp was a three-year old search and app discovery startup that was acquired by Apple earlier this year. The reason for the acquisition was reportedly to improve the App Store search and app discovery. It appears the first of those efforts are being deployed in iOS 6.

    iOS 6 search results on left, Chomp app shown on right

    On the iPhone, the new search results show a single tile result that can be swiped to move to each new result. Chomp’s iOS app used a similar tile system in their search results.

    In thread in our forums, some users are already unhappy with the shift as it is slower to browse through many results.

    Meanwhile, 9to5Mac notes several other changes in App Store functionality such as Genius support, Purchased section and Podcast search:

    Also adding to the iOS 6 App Store updates, Apple has enabled the Genius recommendation section this evening, providing users with apps that may be in their interest to download. Furthermore, the purchased section has also joined the party, displaying all the apps a user has downloaded to their account, making it easy to retrieve favorite apps. Last but certainly not least, the iTunes Store has been updated with the ability to once again search for podcasts.

    The iPad version of iOS 6 also shows the new tile-based results, but is able to show four results at a time. (screenshot).


  • How many pixels can Apple pack into a 4-inch screen?
    The iPhone’s screen is expected to finally grow beyond the confines of its seemingly permanent 3.5-inch screen. What does that mean for pixel density and resolution?
  • Justifying Apple’s $1bn verdict
    The Apple/Samsung trial jury foreman justifies the verdict, but says Android need not be worried
  • Hacker ‘steals’ police force data
    What appear to be computer logins and passwords for Hertfordshire Police officers are published online after the force website is hacked.
  • X PRIZE Foundation: New Software Can Diagnose Parkinson’s Disease Simply By Listening To Your Voice
    Software like Apple’s Siri that responds to your voice is convenient and incredibly cool, but what if a similar kind of voice analysis could diagnose disease?
  • Parallels 8 retuned for Mountain Lion, Windows 8
    The virtualization software for Macs now can marry OS X’s dictation to Windows apps or Windows notifications to OS X. Also: Better Windows 8 screen-edge controls.
  • What users are saying about open clouds
    Market research firm IDC says that data from a new survey shows that “open cloud is key for 72 percent of customers.”
  • High Street follow my leader
    Harnessing data to fight the big digital retailers
  • Robert J. Elisberg: Live from IFA Berlin: New Tech in the Old World
    If the maniacal zoo every year of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is Disneyland for adults, then IFA Berlin is Christmas in August.
  • Bits Blog: Apple Rejects App Tracking Drone Strikes
    Apple has rejected an iPhone app that puts United States drone strikes on an interactive map because it ran afoul of Apple’s rules on objectionable content.

  • Rick Tumlinson: The Right Goes the Wrong Direction in Space
    Having seen in Tampa several days of celebration of American ideals such as individual initiatives, entrepreneurship, and enterprise, to actually read the 2012 Republican Party Platform’s take on U.S. space policy was almost nauseating.
  • Front Row: Shopbop Gets a Makeover
    The Web site Shopbop gets ready to compete with more polished luxury players.

  • Retina Display Support Coming to Photoshop CS6 and Lightroom 4 in ‘Coming Months’ [Updated]
    Adobe today provided a few more details on its plans for Retina display support on its software, noting that a Retina-compatible version of Photoshop CS6 will be arriving “this Fall”. A Retina version of Lightroom 4 will also be delivered “as soon as the work is complete”.
    Supporting this new technology requires significant work by our product teams and we’re committed to provided a free update to all Photoshop CS6 customers this Fall and Lightroom 4 as soon as the work is complete. Please note that Creative Cloud members will receive Photoshop updates more frequently and receive this update in advance of updates for non-members.

    Users of Photoshop Elements should not expect a Retina update in the immediate future, although that team is still looking into adding support for it.

    Adobe Photoshop was one of the high-profile applications highlighted by Apple at June’s Worldwide Developers Conference as having Retina display support in the works. Adobe, Autodesk, and Blizzard were three major software companies Apple noted it had already been working with on Retina compatibility, but it is still taking some time for developers to make their applications fully compatible with the new ultra high-resolution display found on the Retina MacBook Pro.

    Update 1:36 PM: A second blog post notes that Retina support will be coming to many more software titles than just Photoshop and Lightroom.

    We expect to update the following products with HiDPI support, free to all CS6 and Creative Cloud customers, over the next few months:

    Dreamweaver

    Edge Animate

    Illustrator

    Lightroom

    Photoshop

    Photoshop Touch

    Prelude

    Adobe Premiere Pro

    SpeedGrade

    We are currently evaluating the roadmap for when other products may support HiDPI displays, and we will announce those plans as they are finalized.


  • Open Source Image Editor GIMP Now Available as a Native OS X App [Mac Blog]
    GimplogoThe free, open-source image editor GIMP is now available for OS X as a native application. It is available for download from Gimp.org.

    GIMP is a popular and fairly powerful free image editor from the linux world that is basically like a freeware version of Photoshop, complete with many of the tools used for photo retouching and image manipulation that you’d expect. It’s a great free PS alternative, but Mac users have long had to install X11 to get it to run. But not anymore! The newest version of Gimp for Mac OS X is bundled as a self-contained native app, that means no X11 installations, no Xcode, nothing but a simple dmg download.

    Previously, GIMP required the installation of X11, a windowing system for some specialized software — something that is difficult for more inexperienced users to accomplish. Pixelmator is an excellent alternative image editor for most users, though it currently costs $15.


Mobile Technology News, August 30, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

Mobile Technology News, August 29, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

  • HTC has ‘no intention’ to settle with Apple, say reports
    HTC remains defiant, at least publicly, in the wake of the ruling against Samsung in the U.S.
  • Date set over Samsung ‘phone ban’
    Apple’s legal motion to have some Samsung mobile phones banned in the US will now be heard in court in December, a judge says.
  • Square Feet: Tech Firms in Manhattan Trade Trendy Lofts for Midtown Bargains
    Increases in commercial rents in Manhattan have led a range of technology companies to leave hipper neighborhoods for cheaper rents in Midtown.
  • F.A.A. to Review Rules on Use of Electronic Devices
    The agency will appoint a group to study air travel rules and make recommendations on changes, but in-flight cellphone calls will continue to be banned.
  • Apple Unsuccessfully Tried to Purchase Exclusive Access to TSMC Chip Production for iOS Devices
    Bloomberg reports that Apple and Qualcomm each put forth investment bids topping $1 billion in attempting to secure exclusive access to chip supplies from Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), but the bids were declined as TSMC has sought to retain flexibility for its production. While Apple’s effort has so far been unsuccessful, it does appear to be part of the company’s continuing strategy to lessen its dependence on Samsung for components in its mobile devices.
    The two companies are trying to satisfy booming demand for smartphones, a market estimated by to be worth $219.1 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg Industries. Any deal would give Apple an alternate supplier to Samsung Electronics Co., which builds the main chip used in the iPhone and iPad and is also its biggest rival in smartphones. Qualcomm needs to boost supply, since shortages are starting to limit earnings.

    TSMC has, however, indicated in recent weeks that it would be open to dedicating one or two of its factories to a single customer, but it is unclear if Apple is pursuing that alternative in the absence of a deal for complete exclusivity.

    Rumors dating back to March 2011 had pegged Apple as working with TSMC on production of the Ax-series chips that power Apple’s iOS devices, but production issues were cited as a primary reason for those plans falling through and Apple remaining with Samsung for the time being.

    Samsung has been working hard to compartmentalize its patent and design dispute with Apple in an effort to prevent the fallout from that situation from affecting component supply contracts. But a number of rumors in recent years have pointed to Apple seeking out alternate suppliers for some portion of its component needs as part of a strategic effort to diversify its supply chain away from Samsung and its increasingly competitive position in the mobile device marketplace.


  • Bits Blog: Google Uses Its Home Page to Push Nexus 7 Tablet
    Google’s stark white home page is the most-viewed Web site on the Internet, and Google is taking advantage of that by advertising its Nexus 7 tablet there.
  • iPhone 5 aside, what is NFC? (FAQ)
    Whether NFC lands on the iPhone 5 or not, it’s a technology that’s appearing on a lot of high-profile devices.
  • Tech pushes athletes beyond human limits
    Should tech push athletes beyond human limits?
  • Scosche Already Designing New Dock Connector Accessories
    iLounge reports on images from an anonymous tipster showing off the first photos of accessories for the new Apple Dock connector.

    [Images removed at request of Scosche]

    The products appear to come from Scosche and incorporate both a micro USB plug, as well as an adapter for the new iPhone dock connector.

    The charger will presumably charge devices that use either the micro USB plug or Apple’s new dock connector. The new smaller dock connector has been rumored to be replacing the current 30-pin connector. Photos of the new dock cable have already been leaked. 3rd party accessory makers appear to already be working on compatible devices to be able to provide accessories at or near launch.



    Old dock connector pictured on top, and new smaller dock connector pictured below.


  • Rock Health Announces 100K Investment for Startups Accepted to Fourth Class
    Rock Health, the non profit digital health startup incubator, has just sweetened the deal for applicants to their already competitive fourth class.
  • United Airlines ‘network outage’ snarls air travel
    As complaints mounted, one passenger stuck on the runway pledged on Twitter to “continue to rant about United Airlines till my plane takes off.” United now says the problem is under control.
  • Apple to Upgrade AirPlay to Allow Wireless Streaming Without Wi-Fi?
    Apple  iPad  Stream movies and music wirelessly with AirPlayApple is planning an improvement to its AirPlay audio and video streaming technology, according to a report from The Telegraph.

    The new AirPlay system would allow streaming devices like the iPhone or iPad to directly send content to a set of speakers or other receiver without a Wi-Fi network. The Telegraph expects ‘AirPlay Direct’ to be announced on September 12, together with the next-generation iPhone.

    Sources familiar with the iPhone-maker’s plans said that Apple wants to improve the AirPlay wireless music streaming technology, which currently requires Airplay speakers and a WiFi network. The new version will require just speakers or a hifi and an iDevice; the iPhone, iPod or iPad would form its own network to allow a direct connection and music playback.

    The Telegraph expects Apple to promote AirPlay Direct as a replacement to the hardware connection on many iPhone/iPod docks, and allow playback of music wirelessly from device to receiver.


  • Lexmark to quit inkjet printers
    Lexmark is to stop making inkjet printers and inks, and plans to sell off related patents, in order to boost profits.
  • Samsung Case Puts Apple Closer to Google Fight
    By making its own hardware, Google could end up more squarely in Apple’s sights. The jury’s findings in the case could potentially force Google to adjust its software, too.
  • Chinese Firm Makes Knockoff ‘iPhone 5′ From Mockups [iOS Blog]
    NewImage

    A Chinese firm has already created a knockoff of what is supposedly the next iPhone. As reported by the French site NowhereElse.fr [Google Translate], an Android phone called the Goophone i5 was designed to look like the leaked images of the next iPhone.

    Though the new iPhone is expected to be taller vertically, the Goophone sports a 940×640 3.5″ screen, a 5 megapixel rear camera and a 1.3 megapixel front camera. Unsurprisingly, no pricing or availability information on the Goophone is available.


  • I.B.M. Mainframe Evolves to Serve the Digital World
    Executives said the company’s new line of mainframe computers can tackle any trend in corporate computing, from the cloud to so-called green computing.
  • Newly-Discovered Java 7 Security Vulnerability Poses Risks to Macs
    Just two weeks after Oracle officially took over responsibility for Java on OS X with the launch of Java SE 7 Update 6, a new Java vulnerability has been discovered to pose a significant threat to systems running the software. Krebs on Security highlighted the issue yesterday, noting that it affects all versions of Java 7 on most browsers.
    News of the vulnerability (CVE-2012-4681) surfaced late last week in a somewhat sparse blog post by FireEye, which said the exploit seemed to work against the latest version of Java 7, which is version 1.7, Update 6. This morning, researchers Andre’ M. DiMino & Mila Parkour published additional details on the targeted attacks seen so far, confirming that the zero-day affects Java 7 Update 0 through 6, but does not appear to impact Java 6 and below.

    Initial reports indicated that the exploit code worked against all versions of Internet Explorer, Firefox and Opera, but did not work against Google Chrome. But according to Rapid 7, there is a Metasploit module in development that successfully deploys this exploit against Chrome (on at least Windows XP).

    The report notes that Oracle is moving to a quarterly update cycle for Java, meaning that the next regularly-scheduled update to Java SE 7 is not planned until October, but it is unclear how quickly the company will move to address the issue. In the interim, some security experts are developing an unofficial patch while users are advised to simply disable Java if they do not need it active on their systems.

    Computerworld reports that the issue does indeed affect fully-updated Macs running Java 7 on top of OS X Mountain Lion.

    David Maynor, CTO of Errata Security, confirmed that the Metasploit exploit — which was published less than 24 hours after the bug was found — is effective against Java 7 installed on OS X Mountain Lion.

    “This exploit works on OS X if you are running the 1.7 JRE [Java Runtime Environment],” said Maynor in an update to an earlier blog post.

    JRE 1.7 includes the most-current version of Java 7, dubbed “Update 6,” that was released earlier this month.

    Both Safari 6 and Firefox 14 have been found to be vulnerable to the issue on OS X systems.

    Apple has of course had its own issues with Java vulnerabilities, most recently with the Flashback malware that was able to infect over 600,000 Macs by taking advantage of an exploit in Java 6 that had already been patched by Oracle for most platforms but not by Apple for OS X. It is due to smaller, previous incidents similar to Flashback that Apple had already been moving to shift responsibility for Java updates to Oracle, a move that is taking place with Java 7. But while Mac users will now receive Java updates simultaneously with users on other platforms, Java remains one of the highest-profile targets for attackers seeking to compromise systems on a broad basis.

    Update: CNET noted earlier today that most Mac users are not currently susceptible to the issue, as Java 7 is not installed by default on Macs. The current version of Java installed on Mac remains Java 6 for the time being, so users would have to have manually updated to Java 7 in order for their systems to be vulnerable.


  • Jury Foreman in Apple vs. Samsung Case Speaks to Rationale for Verdict
    With the landmark Apple vs. Samsung patent and design lawsuit resulting a $1 billion verdict for Apple late last week, considerable discussion about the jury’s decision-making process has been making the rounds. Several members of the jury, including foreman Velvin Hogan, gave interviews after the trial, but a new video interview of Hogan by Bloomberg Television’s Emily Chang provides some additional insight into the jury’s thinking. The nearly 17-minute segment covers a number of topics including the jury dynamics, calculation of damages, and how Hogan’s own experience with patents and financial statements helped guide the discussion and evaluation.


    Hogan notes that he initially thought the case might swing Samsung’s way as the jury initially had some difficulty assessing how the validity of the patents should be decided and applied to the case.

    We were at a stalemate, but some of the jurors were not sure of the patent prosecution process. Some were not sure of how prior art could either render a patent acceptable or whether it could invalidate it. What we did is we started talking about one and when the day was over and I was at home, thinking about that patent claim by claim, limit by limit, I had what we would call an a-ha moment and I suddenly decided I could defend this if it was my patent…And with that, I took that story back to the jury and laid it out for them. They understood the points I was talking about and then we meticulously went patent by patent and claim by claim against the test that the judge had given us, because each patent had a different legal premise to judge on. We got those all sorted out and decided which ones were valid and which ones were not.

    Hogan also reiterates the jury’s view that comments by Google demanding that Samsung tweak its product designs to look less similar to the iPhone and iPad were particularly damning, indicating that Samsung’s infringement was willful as it took in Google’s advice and opted not to follow it.

    Overall, the jury found that the evidence in the case “spoke overwhelmingly” to Samsung’s infringement, with the jury having put “each side to the test” equally in weighing both validity and infringement claims, working through each of the involved devices and claimed infringements to reach the $1 billion verdict. Hogan also walks through how that dollar amount was reached, using their own calculations of how much Apple lost in profits from sales of the infringing Samsung devices and then adding in royalty amounts to achieve a final number.


  • SPARX video game shown to be effective in helping teens combat depression
    SPARX, a new video game developed by researchers at the University of Auckland, shows promise in treating teens with mild to moderate depression.

Mobile Technology News, August 28, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

  • Intel quad-core ‘ValleyView’ system-on-a-chip coming
    Intel will beef up its system-on-a-chip design with quad-core variants and faster graphics.
  • Active in Cloud, Amazon Reshapes Computing
    Amazon is quietly upending the world of business computing through its cloud operations, a vast resource that gives companies heavy computing power without the baseline costs.

  • Samsung Case Puts Apple Closer to Google Fight
    By making its own hardware, Google could end up more squarely in Apple’s sights. The jury’s findings in the case could potentially force Google to adjust its software, too.

  • Sony to exit PC-use optical drives, say reports
    Sony is getting out the optical disk business as it tries to restructure and shift to businesses that are more relevant to current device trends.
  • Apple Retail’s Emphasis on Profits Continues, Tied to Operational Perspective of Cook and Browett
    Earlier this month, we reported on several changes at Apple retail stores that were reportedly seeing some employees being laid off or seeing recent promotions being retracted, while other part-time employees were seeing their hours reduced significantly, in some cases to zero. Our report was followed several days later by an acknowledgement from Apple that the company had “messed up” in adjusting its staffing formulas for its retail stores.

    ifoAppleStore now takes a close look at the situation, tying changes in the philosophy of Apple’s retail experience to the passing of Steve Jobs and the operational focus of Apple CEO Tim Cook and new retail chief John Browett. At the most basic level, Jobs served as the champion for former retail chief Ron Johnson’s vision of Apple stores focused on consumer satisfaction, and without Jobs to protect that vision Apple has slipped into a numbers-focused perspective for its retail operations.

    Johnson was champion of customer satisfaction, designing and staffing the stores to provide a superior experience for visitors and buyers alike. He was able to win over Steve Jobs with the concept that revenue and profit should be a secondary goal of Apple’s retail stores.

    But in 2009, Jobs took six months of medical leave and put Tim Cook in charge of the company, including the retail stores. Cook is primarily an “operations guy,” sources explain, and his natural focus is revenues and profits, not customers. While Jobs was away, Cook and chief financial officer Peter Oppenheimer began to confront Johnson on his customer-centric retail philosophy—both felt the stores didn’t generate enough revenues to justify operating expenses.

    The report claims that Cook hired Browett to replace Johnson, who departed Apple to lead department store chain JC Penney last year, specifically because of his focus on “traditional concepts of retailing” that prioritize revenues and profits as the key performance metrics.



    Tim Cook (left) and John Browett (right)

    Even with Apple reportedly having reversed a number of the staffing changes that brought the company such significant publicity earlier this month, stores are reportedly still subject to directives reducing workshop offerings for customers and specifying policies on staff evaluation and compensation that prioritize profits over the customer experience and employee satisfaction.


  • iTunes Festival 2012 Live Streaming App Appears on Apple TV
    Back in May, Apple announced that its annual iTunes Festival in London would be moving to September for 2012, with the event once again offering 30 days of free concerts at The Roundhouse. While tickets to the shows have been awarded on a lottery basis, Apple this year is offering access to the concerts with a number of live streaming options including through the iTunes Festival website, through a dedicated universal iOS app, and through Apple TV.



    For those interested in watching the shows on Apple TV, the company has just pushed out an automatic update adding the iTunes Festival app to users’ set-top boxes, making it easy for users to access the shows from the main menu of the device.

    This is not the first time Apple has experimented with delivering live content directly to the Apple TV, as the company earlier this year offered a live stream of a Paul McCartney concert through both iTunes and the Apple TV.

    The 2012 iTunes Festival kicks off on September 1 with Usher and runs daily throughout the month until closing with Muse on September 30.


  • Foxconn International shares fall
    Shares of Foxconn International Holdings, the world biggest contract mobile phone manufacturer, slump more than 8% after a dismal earnings report.
  • Michael Dell says he is OK with the ‘post-PC’ era
    Michael Dell says it’s smooth sailing in the post-PC era. Though that sentiment seems to conflict with recent data from market research firms.
  • VIDEO: Are gamers 21st Century athletes?
    Meet the Usain Bolts of the video gaming world
  • What’s missing in Windows 8 apps
    Come October 26, Microsoft will face two battles for Windows 8. Not only does it have to convince people that the OS is worth upgrading to, but it must land with competitive apps. Here’s what they lack so far.
  • OS X Lion 10.7.5 Build 11G45 Seeded to Developers [Mac Blog]
    Apple today seeded a new version of OS X Lio 10.7.5 to developers for testing. The new version, Build 11G45, arrives less than two weeks after the previous seed, and the build increment of nine suggests that Apple has been continuing to make a number of tweaks to the update in preparation for a public launch.



    Apple continues to list no known issues with the update and is asking developers to focus on the same testing areas as in the previous build, which included graphics performance and image and media handling.


  • VIDEO: Robot puppetry makes ‘alien art’
    Robotic floating light follows exhibition visitors around
  • Julio Fernandez: Five Tips for Athletes and Brands to Improve Their Online Profiles
    Here are five tips that athletes, brands and you should follow to improve your online profiles and dominate the search engine results page.
  • How to hide data in plain sight
    Criminals can hide data from surveillance in plain sight
  • Is technology killing the lure of company heritage?
    Is technology killing the lure of company heritage?
  • Tweetbot for Mac Alpha Program Ended Over Twitter API Restrictions [Mac Blog]
    NewImageFollowing the introduction of new Twitter API guidelines — the rules by which third-party Twitter clients must abide — Tweetbot has decided to end the pre-release testing program of TweetBot for Mac.

    The public Alpha program began more than a month ago to help Tweetbot get feedback on the Mac Twitter client as the developers moved towards final release.

    One of the API changes relates to how many “tokens” a particular Twitter app can have, limiting the total number of customers an app can serve without approval from Twitter. In order to protect their ability to sell the maximum number of copies of the app going forward, Tweetbot has discontinued the alpha program and ceased distribution of the app.

    As some of you may have already noticed the download link for the Tweetbot for Mac alpha no longer works. Twitter’s latest API Changes means now we have a large but finite limit on the number of user tokens we can get for Tweetbot for Mac. We’ve been working with Twitter over the last few days to try to work around this limit for the duration of the beta but have been unable to come up with a solution that was acceptable to them. Because of this we’ve decided its best for us to pull the alpha.

    More than a few pundits have expressed their displeasure with the situation, putting the blame squarely on Twitter. Even so, at this point, Tweetbot for Mac will be available for sale “in the near future” and the developers are merely stopping the public phase of prerelease testing.


  • Hillel Fuld: Stevie Brings the Social Web to the Comfort of Your Couch
    TV is so 2011! What if we could enjoy the TV experience described above but with content of our choice and the ability to actively engage with that content?
  • Google reacts to Apple patent win
    Google says it does not want Samsung’s defeat in last week’s patent case to “limit” customers’ access to Android.
  • There’s A Wrong Way To Eat Tic Tacs?
    Dispensing a Tic Tac seems like a pretty simple task, but recent reports suggest there could be more to extracting the tiny breath mints from…

Mobile Technology News, August 27, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

  • Fighting Fantasy is resurrected
    The Fighting Fantasy series returns with a new book and apps to mark its 30th anniversary.
  • Inside Huawei, the Chinese tech giant that’s rattling nerves in DC
    A Congressional committee wants to know if this telecommunications powerhouse is a national security threat. Why? CNET went to China to find out.
  • A tour of Huawei’s Chinese operations (pictures)
    The Chinese telecoms gear maker gave CNET access to its headquarters in Shenzhen as well as an R&D facility in Shanghai as it works to counter the allegations of some U.S. lawmakers that it has ties to the Chinese government.
  • Apple-Samsung Case Muddies the Future of Innovation
    For companies that emphasize distinctive design, the Samsung patent verdict was a validation of their efforts.

  • Saudi Oil Producer’s Computers Restored After Cyberattack
    Saudi Aramco, the world’s biggest oil producer, has resumed operating its computer networks after a virus infected about 30,000 of its workstations earlier this month, the company said Sunday.

  • Mark Stadnyk Challenges a Sweeping Revision in Patent Law
    Mark Stadnyk is suing the United States government, aiming to block a patent law that he says is a triumph of corporate lobbying that will hurt lone inventors like him.

  • Google Looks to Distance Android from Apple vs. Samsung Ruling
    The Verge reports that Google has officially responded to Friday’s ruling in the Apple vs. Samsung case that saw a jury award Apple over $1 billion in deciding that Samsung had infringed upon Apple’s patents and trade dress.

    In its statement, Google attempts to distance itself from the controversy somewhat, indicating that most of the issues addressed in the trial do not relate to Android itself. The issues instead deal with Samsung’s specific software implementations and its hardware design decisions. Google writes:

    The court of appeals will review both infringement and the validity of the patent claims. Most of these don’t relate to the core Android operating system, and several are being re-examined by the US Patent Office. The mobile industry is moving fast and all players – including newcomers – are building upon ideas that have been around for decades. We work with our partners to give consumers innovative and affordable products, and we don’t want anything to limit that.

    Some of the key pieces of evidence weighing in Apple’s favor in the jury’s mind were in fact 2010 memos and conversations between Google and Samsung that included Google “demanding” Samsung make changes in its implementation of Android over concerns that it was too similar to Apple’s iOS. From one internal Samsung email describing Google’s concerns:

    “I am notifying you of the team leader’s directives from the executives’ meeting yesterday,” the message begins. The sixth item on the list addresses a need to “respond to the issue of design similarity for the S series,” which Samsung designer Kim Jin Soo testified was a reference to the company’s S series of smartphones.

    “Google is demanding distinguishable design vis-à-vis the iPad,” according to the e-mail. “Consider design distinguishability for the items demanded by Google while maintaining the current design, and in regards to each carrier’s demands.”

    With the Korea Stock Exchange having just opened for trading for the first time since the ruling, Samsung’s stock is currently trading down 7%. Apple’s stock rose nearly 2% in after hours trading Friday following the ruling.


  • Photos of Assembled ‘iPhone 5′ Front Panel with Home Button, Front Camera and Shielding Installed
    Part leaks claimed to be for the next-generation iPhone continue to surface as the all-but-confirmed September 12 media event introduction approaches, with the latest batch of photos showing what appears to be the most completely assembled front panel seen yet. The new photos, which were highlighted by Apple.pro [Google translation], were posted to a Photobucket account that previously posted photos of measurements showing that the third-generation iPad would be thicker than the iPad 2, as well as the first leaked photo of the next-generation iPhone front panel in white.



    Assembled front panel complete with LCD frame, front camera, and home button

    The latest set of photos posted to the account shows a nearly fully assembled front panel with even more parts than seen in last week’s leak of the front panel with the LCD attached. The new photos show not only the LCD attached to the front panel but also the home button installed and secured by a metal bracket, the shielding frame for the display that was first seen as a standalone part earlier this month, and the front-facing camera installed behind additional shielding.



    Closeups of top portion showing flex cables for display and front camera

    Increasing numbers of parts are leaking in ever more complete states of assembly, offering good looks at the overall appearance and layout of the next-generation iPhone.

    While the front of the device will appear very similar to the iPhone 4S/4 with the exception of a taller screen and slight tweaks in the locations of the camera and sensors, it is the rear of the device that seems to be generating the most discussion. The forthcoming iPhone appears to incorporate a unibody design that will incorporate a two-toned rear/side shell featuring a large metal section in the center paired with two strips of glass or plastic at the top and bottom that will allow for transmission of the numerous types of signals necessary for the device’s operation.



    Closeup of home button installed behind metal bracket

    Note: Watermarks have been obscured due to political statements contained within them.


  • Samsung shares plunge on verdict
    Shares of Samsung Electronics fall 7%, the most in almost four years, after a jury in the US finds it copied designs from rival Apple.
  • VIDEO: Samsung shares slide after Apple win
    Samsung Electronics shares have tumbled more than 7% after Apple’s legal victory in their US patent battle raised concerns about its lucrative smartphone business.
  • Maude Apatow Is Growing Up Writing
    Maude Apatow has famous parents, but she is making a name for herself, a Twitter post and an essay at a time.

  • Displays for 13-Inch Retina MacBook Pro Now in Production
    CNET reports that production has begun on 13.3-inch, 2560×1600 displays that will be incorporated into Apple’s forthcoming smaller Retina MacBook Pro.
    Production has begun of a 2,560-by-1,600 pixel density display that will land on a 13.3-inch MacBook Pro, NPD DisplaySearch analyst Richard Shim told CNET.

    “The supply chain indications are that it’s for a MacBook Pro 13.3 — not a MacBook Air,” said Shim.

    Displays are being made by Samsung, LGD, and Sharp, he said.



    Apple’s MacBook lineup plans for late 2012 and 2013 (Source: Ming-Chi Kuo/KGI Securities)

    Shim indicates that launch supplies for the new 13-inch Retina displays will be higher than seen for the 15-inch displays incorporated into the first Retina MacBook Pro released back in June, reflecting the greater popularity of the 13-inch models compared to their larger siblings.

    “With 15.4 it’s production of a few hundred thousand units versus one to two million for the 13.3,” he said. That 13.3-inch production began in the third quarter.

    Apple has been rumored to be looking to launch the 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro in October, and with mass production of the displays for the forthcoming machines now underway, it seems that Apple may be on track to meet that timeframe.


  • Space cubed: Dawn of the nano-sats
    Can’t afford a Curiosity? Fleets of tiny, cube-shaped spacecraft modules could provide a cheaper ticket to explore the cosmos

  • Review of the Twelve South BookBook Vol 2 for iPad
    When I reviewed the Twelve South BookBook for iPhone, I asked a rhetorical question:  Do I recommend the BookBook for iPhone?  Emphatically yes.  The styling is second-to-none, it’s highly functional and with the exception of the rear-facing camera, gives you complete access to your iPhone and its [...]
  • 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro displays in production
    The 13.3-inch version of the Retina MacBook Pro is on the way, an analyst tells CNET. That means more portability and less money compared with the current 15-inch model.
  • Samsung Executive Calls Apple vs. Samsung Ruling ‘Worst Scenario for Us’
    While Samsung has already issued an official statement vowing to fight on against Apple in court cases and to innovate with its products following the $1 billion judgment against the company, The Korea Times reports that executives at the company are “reeling in shock” at the decision.
    Samsung executives were still reeling in shock Sunday, but provided no clear hint on the company’s next move in the showdown with its industry archrival. It’s widely expected that Samsung will appeal, but the outlook for success in the appeal now looks rather murky.

    “It’s absolutely the worst scenario for us,” a senior Samsung executive said as he rushed into the company’s compound in southern Seoul.

    Inside the building, Choi Gee-sung, former Samsung Electronics CEO and now the head of Samsung Group’s corporate strategy division, was holding an emergency meeting attended by Shin Jong-kyun, the company’s mobile devices chief, and Lee Dong-joo, lead marketing official.



    Both Apple and Samsung will be making post-verdict motions in the case, with Samsung seeking to have Judge Lucy Koh overrule the jury’s decision before filing an official appeal while Apple is likely to seek a tripling of the damage award based on rulings that Samsung’s infringement was willful. Apple will also be pursuing injunctions barring the sale of Samsung devices found to infringe Apple’s patents.


  • AT&T’s Vacation Blackout Pinned Down to September 21-30 for iPhone Launch
    Two weeks ago, BGR reported that AT&T was planning for a launch of the next-generation iPhone in late September, instituting an “all-hands-on-deck policy” for the last two weeks of the month and into October.

    That news was followed last week with word that Verizon had instituted its own vacation blackout for September 21-30, bolstering claims that the new iPhone will launch in the United States on Friday, September 21.



    TechCrunch now reports that AT&T’s vacation blackout period has been pinned down to the same September 21-30 timeframe seen at Verizon. According to the report, AT&T staff will be training up for an “iconic release” scheduled for that time, with all indications pointing to the next-generation iPhone as the device in question.

    According to an AT&T sales rep, AT&T staff has been given a vacation blackout from September 21 to September 30, just like Verizon employees. Our source also mentioned that blue carrier employees are undergoing training for an “iconic release.”

    Sounds like the next-gen iPhone to me.

    Apple is expected to introduce the next iPhone with a media event on September 12, with availability in the United States apparently set for nine days later. Several other major countries are likely to see a launch on that same date, with other markets following quickly in subsequent weeks.

    Apple is reportedly also preparing to launch its “iPad mini” in the coming months, but the company is said to be planning a separate media event for October to introduce that product.


  • News Analysis: Apple-Samsung Case Shows Smartphone as Lawsuit Magnet
    The smartphone patent wars are unusually complex, and the courts, rather than the patent office, are pushing companies toward a truce. In the end, consumers may be the losers.

  • One Year Later, Hurricane Costs Still Emotional Conflict
    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A year after Hurricane Irene knocked out power to millions across the Northeast, utilities and regulators are still sparring over how…

Mobile Technology News, August 26, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

  • News Analysis: Apple-Samsung Case Shows Smartphone as Lawsuit Magnet
    The smartphone patent wars are unusually complex, and the courts, rather than the patent office, are pushing companies toward a truce. In the end, consumers may be the losers.

  • Maude Apatow Is Growing Up Writing
    Maude Apatow has famous parents, but she is making a name for herself, a Twitter post and an essay at a time.

  • Apple Online Stores Nearing Immediate Availability of Retina MacBook Pro Models [Mac Blog]
    Some ten weeks after the launch of the 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro, Apple is just now catching up with demand, as evidenced by shipping estimates for new orders in many countries’ Apple Online Stores moving to “in stock” status for standard configurations. The major exception to this status is in the Americas, where estimates have moved to 2-4 business days. These new estimates are improvements from the 5-7 business day quotes that were instituted just over three weeks ago.



    UK online store showing “in stock” status for Retina MacBook Pro

    Build-to-order configurations understandably take some additional processing time in many markets, with customizations generally bumping estimates up to 5-7 business days. Interestingly, customizing an order in an online store in the Americas does not result in any additional processing time, with all configurations being quoted the same 2-4 business day estimate as seen for stock models.

    Some customers are undoubtedly still waiting for signs of a 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro, which has been rumored for an October launch. With Apple also appearing set to launch a new iPhone, the “iPad mini”, and updated iPod models, the company seems primed to pack in a significant number of updates for the remainder of the calendar year.

    (Thanks, Nathan!)


  • Samsung teases next Windows 8 thing?
    Samsung this week was teasing what appears to be a newfangled laptop-tablet hybrid.
  • John Pavley: eSports and How to Stay Connected with Your Grown-Up Kids
    Looking around the vast auditorium floor I see only a handful of parents. But that’s ok. I’d rather spend a weekend in the world that my kids inhabit than force them to suffer through mine.
  • The Windows 8 ‘kick me’ sign
    Microsoft no doubt knew it was going to have to face a lot of flak over its new operating system. And here’s some more.
  • John Glenn Mourns Loss Of Neil Armstrong
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth, said Neil Armstrong dedicated himself to his country and will always be…
  • Jury Awards $1 Billion to Apple in Samsung Patent Case
    The jury found that Samsung infringed upon a series of Apple patents on mobile devices, in a closely watched court case that could have broad implications for the industry.

  • Jury Members Discuss Thought Process Behind Apple vs. Samsung Verdict


    Reuters and CNet have interviewed members of the Apple / Samsung patent trial jury who awarded Apple over $1 billion in damages over patent infringement claims against Samsung.

    Reuters spoke with jury foreman Velvin Hogan who explained that they found Apple’s arguments persuasive about the need to protect innovation. Furthermore, Hogan says it was “absolutely” clear based on Samsung executive testimony that the infringement was purposeful.

    In the CNet interview with another Apple v. Samsung juror, Manuel Ilagan reiterated that it was “clear there was infringement”. When asked for specifics, he said:

    “Well, there were several. The e-mails that went back and forth from Samsung execs about the Apple features that they should incorporate into their devices was pretty damning to me. And also, on the last day, they showed the pictures of the phones that Samsung made before the iPhone came out and ones that they made after the iPhone came out. Some of the Samsung executives they presented on video [testimony] from Korea — I thought they were dodging the questions. They didn’t answer one of them. They didn’t help their cause.”

    Both jurors claim that their decision was deliberate and not rushed. According to Ilagan, the process was helped by the experience within the jury pool. Hogan, the jury foreman, had previously worked as an engineer and holds a patent himself. Meanwhile, others on the jury were said to also have engineering and legal experience.

    In determining the award amount, Hogan reports that they felt Apple’s demands of $2.75 billion was “extraordinarily high”, especially taking into account the uncertainty in Apple’s ability to have sold significantly more iPhones due to component supply constraints. That said, Hogan told Reuters they did want a send a message.

    “We didn’t want to give carte blanche to a company, by any name, to infringe someone else’s intellectual property,” Hogan told Reuters a day after the verdict.


  • Twitter Reacts To Neil Armstrong’s Death
    It’s a sad day for those who long to venture into space, and for those who prefer to watch those adventures from the comforts of…
  • Neil Armstrong Dead At 82
    According to NBC News, Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, has died at age 82. He died at 2:45 p.m. on Saturday, suffering…
  • 7.85" iPad to be Called ‘iPad Mini’ and Wi-Fi (Cloud iTunes) Coming to iPod Nano?
    Japanese blog Macotakara claims to have additional details about Apple’s upcoming 7.85″ iPad and the next generation iPod nano.

    First, the site reports that the new smaller iPad device will indeed be called “iPad mini”:

    According to Asian source, the name of Apple’s new product, which are expected to have 7″85′ and called as iPad mini, will be named as “iPad mini” officially. This source expects that “iPad” logo will be printed on back of case same as “iPod” is printed on iPod nano and iPod touch, and it means one new product will be added on iPad’s product brand genre.

    Next, the Japanese blog also believes the next iPod nano may come with Wi-Fi capabilities in order to enable iTunes in the Cloud support:

    Next iPod nano may equip Wi-Fi antenna on side of that case, and support iTunes Music Cloud in order Apple to provide a iconic product to promote the largest Music Store in the world.

    Wi-Fi access would allow iPod nano users to redownload any past music, movies or TV shows onto their device when connected to a hotspot.

    Macotakara again notes the mysterious holes found on the back casing of iPod Touch and offers a guess at NFC capabilities, but has no clear answer. Overall, Macotakara has had a mixed track record with their rumor reports.


  • Empire State Building Shooting Leads To Social Media Payday For One Instagram User
    As the world tries to figure out the motives of the Empire State Building shooter, one random Instagram photo provides a window into the dirty…
  • Apple-Samsung verdict shows that Microsoft thinks different
    If there’s one peculiar conclusion from the hastily decided Apple-Samsung battle, it’s that Microsoft is more innovative than the Android brands.
  • Apple’s ‘iPad Mini’ Media Event Planned for October
    Following a hint from The Loop‘s Jim Dalrymple suggesting that Apple’s “iPad mini” will be introduced at a second media event following the next-generation iPhone event all but confirmed for September 12, AllThingsD now backs up the claim with its own sources saying that Apple is planning for an iPad mini introduction in October.
    Apple’s next generation iPhone and its so-called “iPad mini” will debut at two separate events this fall, rather than a single one as has been widely speculated, according to several sources. [...]

    Only after the next generation iPhone is out the door and on sale will Apple announce the smaller iPad it’s been working on. That device, which is expected to have a display of less than eight inches, will be uncrated at a second special event, which sources said is currently scheduled for October.



    Mockup of 7.85-inch “iPad mini” next to an iPhone (courtesy of CiccareseDesign)

    AllThingsD has a reliable track record when it comes to leaking Apple media event plans, and when paired with Dalrymple’s past history it seems likely that Apple will indeed be holding two separate events in the coming months to introduce the next-generation iPhone and the company’s smaller iPad.


  • Samsung to appeal in Apple case
    Samsung vows to appeal after a US court ordered the South Korean giant to pay Apple more than $1bn (£665m) for infringing design patents.
  • Famed Architect To Design Stunning New Facebook Offices
  • Claimed Next-Generation iPod Touch Case Points to Significant Redesign
    While part leaks for the next-generation iPhone have been plentiful, similar leaks for an updated iPod touch have been harder to locate, with a front panel showing an opening for a larger 4-inch display having been the only known leak so far.

    Back in late July, Macotakara reported that the device would adopt the A5 system-on-a-chip found in the iPhone 4S, as well as a buffed aluminum shell. The report also claimed that there is a mystery hole in the lower portion of the rear shell, with a rendering based on the rumors showing the feature located in the lower center of the device.

    GizChina now posts photos of what is said to be a case for the next-generation iPod touch, seemingly showing a less-tapered design. The case shows a widened rear camera hole that the report suggests could hint at the addition of an LED flash as seen on the iPhone. The current iPod touch does have a microphone in that location, however, and the opening in this new case may simply be to accommodate the same feature.

    The new case also shows the “mystery hole” described in the Macotakara report, but it is located in the lower corner of the rear shell rather than in the center.

    As you can see from the photos these cases suggest that the next generation iPod touch will have a new design (at least to the rear) and seem to be have a much less pronounced taper to the edges when compared to the current iPod touch 4.

    The cases could also give away possible details as to the spec of the 5th generation iPod touch 5. The hole around the camera area to the left for example looks to have been elongated and tapered to fit around a possible LED flash to help with low light photography, and there is also the appearance of a new ‘mystery hole’ in the lower left hand side of the case.



    The report speculates that the mystery hole could be for a speaker or microphone of some sort, but there have yet to be any part leaks to provide additional hints at its function.

    As with the tapered iPhone cases seen in 2011, case companies are sometimes incorrect in their designs, and thus part leaks such as those seen for the next-generation iPhone are regarded as much more significant. But in the absence of major part leaks for the next iPod touch, cases bearing a new design are currently one of the only pieces of evidence available for fueling speculation and discussion of a potential redesign for the device.


  • BLOOD, SWEAT AND GEARS: Robotic World Cup Lets Metal Men Test Their Mettle
    This competition isn’t between humans, though, it’s between robots. Twenty six teams of robotics experts have converged on Bristol, England, to test the mettle of…

Mobile Technology News, August 25, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

  • Jury Awards $1 Billion to Apple in Samsung Patent Case
    The jury found that Samsung infringed upon a series of Apple patents on mobile devices, in a closely watched court case that could have broad implications for the industry.

  • Tim Cook Addresses Apple Employees After Lawsuit Victory
    Apple CEO Tim Cook addressed corporate Apple employees tonight after the massive win from their patent litigation against Samsung. The email, republished by 9to5Mac, is quoted here:
    Today was an important day for Apple and for innovators everywhere.

    Many of you have been closely following the trial against Samsung in San Jose for the past few weeks. We chose legal action very reluctantly and only after repeatedly asking Samsung to stop copying our work. For us this lawsuit has always been about something much more important than patents or money. It’s about values. We value originality and innovation and pour our lives into making the best products on earth. And we do this to delight our customers, not for competitors to flagrantly copy.

    We owe a debt of gratitude to the jury who invested their time in listening to our story. We were thrilled to finally have the opportunity to tell it. The mountain of evidence presented during the trial showed that Samsung’s copying went far deeper than we knew.

    The jury has now spoken. We applaud them for finding Samsung’s behavior willful and for sending a loud and clear message that stealing isn’t right.

    I am very proud of the work that each of you do.

    Today, values have won and I hope the whole world listens.

    Tim

    A jury found that Samsung had willfully infringed on both Apple’s patents and trade dress for the iPhone and issued a verdict of over $1 billion in damages to be paid to Apple.


  • A Verdict That Alters an Industry
    Companies that make smartphones will have to be cautious in how they design products to avoid being accused of imitating Apple.

  • Samsung told to pay Apple $1bn
    A US jury says Samsung should pay Apple $1.05bn in damages after a patent dispute, and rejects claims Apple breached its rival’s technologies.
  • Apple Seeds Safari 6.0.1 for OS X Lion to Developers [Mac Blog]
    Apple today seeded a developer build of Safari 6.0.1 for OS X Lion for testing, giving developers a chance to test out the next minor standalone update to Apple’s Internet browser. Safari 6.0.1 is included in the OS X 10.8.2 developer build seeded yesterday, but Apple will also be releasing the update for users still running OS X Lion.



    The Safari update comes on top of larger developer builds of OS X Lion 10.7.5, with Apple continuing development on Lion even though OS X Mountain Lion and its first update of OS X 10.8.1 have already made their way into the hands of users.


  • Evernote update brings improved photo support and Moleskine Smart Notebook support
    While all the news today is about the Apple vs. Samsung trial, Evernote has been hosting their annual conference, Evernote Trunk Conference in San Francisco.  The annual conference has already yielded a significant update to the popular productivity app for iOS that brings significant improvements [...]
  • Maude Apatow Is Growing Up Writing
    Maude Apatow has famous parents, but she is making a name for herself, a Twitter post and an essay at a time.

  • Apple vs. Samsung Verdict: Preliminary Injunction Hearing, Possible Consequences, and an Appeal
    Now with the verdict of the Apple vs. Samsung patent lawsuit fallen clearly on Apple’s side, the next step will be a hearing on preliminary injunctions to stop sales of the infringing Samsung devices. The Verge reports that the hearing will take place on September 20th after Apple submits its requests by August 29th, giving Samsung two weeks to respond.

    Meanwhile, The Verge’s Nilay Patel, a former lawyer, speculates on the overall consequences of the verdict. Patel, of course, expects Apple to file preliminary injunctions to bar the sale of infringing devices. In the long term, he expects that other Android manufacturers will start making changes to both UI and physical appearance in response to the verdict.

    In the long term, we’re sure to see lots of UI behaviors change across Android — most companies have already moved away from the bounceback scrolling behavior protected by the Apple patent in this case, and we’re sure to see tap-to-zoom and multitouch scrolling behavior affected on new devices as well. We’re also sure to see new handsets adopt highly differentiated designs, as Apple has proven both its design patent and trade dress claims are strong enough to persuade a jury.

    Meanwhile, All Things D points out that Samsung will certainly pursue the appeal process to attempt to overturn the outcome.


  • Apple release statement on today’s verdict
    Apple has release the following statement to The Loop
    “We are grateful to the jury for their service and for investing the time to listen to our story and we were thrilled to be able to finally tell it,” Apple said in a statement provided to The Loop. “The mountain of evidence presented during the [...]
  • Apple and Samsung Respond to the $1 Billion Patent Verdict
    NYTimes reports on the responses from Apple and Samsung about today’s patent verdict which found largely in favor of Apple and resulted in an over $1 billion verdict against Samsung.

    Apple’s spokesperson Katie Cotton:

    We are grateful to the jury for their service and for investing the time to listen to our story and we were thrilled to be able to finally tell it. The mountain of evidence presented during the trail showed that Samsung’s copying went far deeper than even we knew. The lawsuits between Apple and Samsung were about much more than patents or money. They were about values. At Apple, we value originality and innovation and pour our lives into making the best products on earth. We make these products to delight our customers, not for our competitors to flagrantly copy. We applaud the court for finding Samsung’s behavior willful and for sending a loud and clear message that stealing isn’t right.

    Samsung issued this statement:

    Today’s verdict should not be viewed as a win for Apple, but as a loss for the American consumer. It will lead to fewer choices, less innovation, and potentially higher prices. It is unfortunate that patent law can be manipulated to give one company a monopoly over rectangles with rounded corners, or technology that is being improved every day by Samsung and other companies. Consumers have the right to choices, and they know what they are buying when they purchase Samsung products. This is not the final word in this case or in battles being waged in courts and tribunals around the world, some of which have already rejected many of Apple’s claims. Samsung will continue to innovate and offer choices for the consumer.

    The jury found that Samsung owes Apple $1.05 billion in damages for willfully infringing on Apple’s intellectual property.


  • Bits Blog: Responses to the Trial
    Early reactions evaluate the landmark trial between Apple and Samsung: How enormous a win is this? And what could it mean for the tech industry overall?

  • BREAKING NEWS – Samsung ordered to pay Apple $1B for patent infringements
    The verdict of the Apple and Samsung patent infringement case has just come down and the big loser is Samsung.  The company was ordered to pay Apple $1B US for violations related to patents owned by Apple.  The key findings of the verdict:

    Tap-and-Zoom and Pinch-and-zoom technologies:  Samsung [...]

  • Jury Finds Largely in Favor of Apple in Apple vs. Samsung Trial, Awards More than $1 Billion in Damages
    After three days of deliberations, the jury reached a unanimous verdict in the Apple vs. Samsung trial. The jury found largely for Apple, ruling that Samsung had willfully infringed on both Apple patents and trade dress for the iPhone — though notably the jury found in favor of Samsung on questions regarding its tablets. The jury found that Samsung owes Apple $1.05 billion in damages for willfully infringing on Apple’s intellectual property.

    Apple’s stock price rose to an all-time high, more than $675 per share, in after-hours trading following the verdict.

    The three-week trial has resulted in interesting testimony and evidence from both sides, including looks at early iPhone and iPad prototypes, Apple and Samsung mobile device sales numbers in the U.S., and an internal Samsung memo that examined what the company needed to change in its Galaxy line of smartphones to compete with the iPhone.

    The 9-person jury was asked to fill out a 20-page jury form with more than 700 questions across 33 groups. They were required to come to a unanimous decision on each question and court-watchers didn’t expect a verdict until at least next week.

    NewImage

    The following is our liveblog as the verdict was written:

    The jury was asked to fill out a form covering 33 separate questions regarding patents, trade dress, and antitrust.

    On the first claim, regarding the ’381 “bounce back” patent, the jury finds Samsung guilty on all counts. Samsung infringed on Apple’s patent on a wide variety of products.

    On Apple’s “pinch and zoom” ’915 patent, the jury found that Samsung infringed on all but three products.

    For the “double-tap to zoom” ’163 patent, the jury found that Samsung infringed on a wide number of products, but not all.

    The jury found that Samsung took actions that it knew or should have known were infringing across the ’381, ’915, and ’163 patents on most, though not on all, counts.

    For the ’677 patent, covering Apple’s trade dress registration of the look of the front of the iPhone, the jury found that Samsung did infringe on most devices, but again, not all.

    For the D’087 patent, covering Apple’s trade dress registration of the look of the back of the iPhone, the jury found that Samsung did infringe on some devices, but not all.

    For the ’305 patent, covering the trade dress registration of the iPhone’s home screen, the jury found that Samsung infringed across most devices.

    For the D’889 patent, covering the trade dress registration of the iPad’s appearance, the jury found that Samsung’s tablets do not infringe — one of the first victories for Samsung.

    On the question of whether Samsung Korea knew or should have known it was inducing US subsidiaries to infringe on the D’677, D’087, D’305 and/or D’889 patents, the jury found in favor of Apple across a wide number of phones and patents, though not on the ’889 patent regarding the iPad. These two questions are significant for Apple to receive damages.

    On the question of whether Samsung’s infringement was willful, the jury again found for Apple on a number of patents and devices.

    Finally, the jury ruled that all of Apple’s patents are valid.

    Regarding trade dress, Apple has proven that its unregistered iPhone 3G trade dress was protectable, and the jury found that a number of Samsung phone models violated Apple’s trade dress, though not all of them.

    Overall, the jury is finding for Apple on most counts.

    Regarding damages, the jury finds that Apple should be awarded $1,051,855,000 in damages for willfully violating Apple’s patents and trade dress.

    Next up are Samsung’s claims against Apple.

    The jury has found for Apple regarding its alleged infringement of Samsung’s utility patents on every claim, however Apple did not prove they were invalid. The jury did not award Samsung any damages.

    Finally, Apple did not prove that Samsung violated antitrust obligations regarding its FRAND patents.

    Apple did prove that Samsung is barred from enforcing its ’516 and ’941 patents.

    Update: CNet provides a nice breakdown of patents and the devices found to infringe.


  • Engineers Detail Extensive Efforts to Rewrite Facebook iOS App [iOS Blog]
    NewImageFacebook employee Jonathan Dann has written a blog post detailing how the company’s iOS engineering team designed earlier Facebook for iPhone apps and the extensive coding that was required to rewrite the new Facebook 5.0 app.

    The post is a bit technical in parts, but is worth a read for developers and others interested in how one of the most popular iPhone apps gets made.

    An excerpt:

    One of the biggest advantages we’ve gained from building on native iOS has been the ability to make the app fast. Now, when you scroll through your news feed on the new Facebook for iOS, you’ll notice that it feels much faster than before. One way we have achieved this is by re-balancing where we perform certain tasks. For example, in iOS, the main thread drives the UI and handles touch events, so the more work we do on the main thread, the slower the app feels. Instead, we take care to perform computationally expensive tasks in the background. This means all our networking activity, JSON parsing, NSManagedObject creation, and saving to disk never touches the main thread.

    To give another example, we use Core Text to lay out many of our strings, but layout calculations can quickly become a bottleneck. With our new iOS app, when we download new content, we asynchronously calculate the sizes for all these strings, cache our CTFramesetters (which can be expensive to create), and then use all these calculations later when we present the story into our UITableView.

    Finally, when you start Facebook for iOS, you want to see your news feed, not a loading spinner. To provide the best experience possible, we now show previously-cached content immediately. But this introduces a new problem: If you have a lot of stories in your news feed, UITableView throws a small spanner in the works by calling the delegate method -tableView:heightForRowAtIndexPath: for each story in your news feed in order to work out how tall to make its scrollbar. This would result in the app loading all the story data from disk and calculating the entire story layout solely to return the height of the story, meaning startup would get progressively slower as you accumulate more stories.

    The solution to this particular problem has two main parts. Firstly, when we do our initial asynchronous layout calculations, we also store the height of the story in Core Data. In doing so, we completely avoid layout calculation in -tableView:heightForRowAtIndexPath:. Secondly, we’ve split up our “story” model object. We only fetch the story heights (and a few other things) from disk on startup. Later, we fetch the rest of the story data, and any more layout calculations we have to do are all performed asynchronously.


  • Evernote unveils small business app. A Google Apps offense?
    With Evernote Business, the company optimizes its “remember anything” platform for business customers, making the cloud-based app much more competitive.
  • In Apple v. Samsung, the jury has spoken
    week in review Jury verdict favors Apple overwhelmingly in a landmark patent decision. Also: Facebook rolls out new features, and an exclusive peek at tech’s most hated company.
  • Evernote and Moleskine Partner on ‘Smart Notebooks’ [iOS Blog]
    The new Evernote Smart Notebook bridges the divide between digital and analog by giving Evernote users the option to take physical notes in a special Moleskine notebook and then easily importing those notes into the Evernote app.

    NewImage
    The notebook is $24.95 and allows a new Page Camera feature in Evernote to take photos of a page and have it immediately available and searchable in Evernote.

    The Smart Notebook also comes with stickers that you can use to specify a certain tag or notebook, so that when you take a picture of a page the app will automatically sort it properly. We’re not exactly sure how the scanning is better than Evernote’s standard character recognition, but the Smart Notebook sounds like a great tool for Evernote die-hards.

    The Evernote Smart Notebook is available for preorder for $24.95 and $29.95 in small and large sizes.

    This isn’t the first time Evernote has done something unique to combine online and offline. Last year it released the Evernote Peek, the first iPad Smart Cover app. The app uses the iPad Smart Cover to create virtual flash cards for studying.


  • South Korean Court Says Apple and Samsung Infringed on Patents
    A South Korean court ordered the companies, the two largest smartphone makers, to compensate each other for patent infringement.

  • South Korean Court Overturns Online Name Verification Law
    Free speech advocates had condemned the identification system, arguing that the government was using perceived abuses as an excuse to discourage political criticism.

Mobile Technology News, August 24, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

Mobile Technology News, August 22, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

Mobile Technology News, August 21, 2012

As developers for tablets and smartphones we like to keep abreast of the latest mobile technology developments . This is a daily digest of mobile development and related technology news gathered from the BBC, the New York Times, New Scientist and the Globe and Mail to name a few. We scour the web for articles concerning, iPhone, iPad and android development, iOS and android operating systems as well as general articles on advances in mobile technology. We hope you find this useful and that it helps to keep you up to date with the latest technology developments.

  • Orange owner gets 4G greenlight
    The telecoms regulator allows the owner of Orange and T-Mobile to launch 4G services, meaning faster broadband could arrive in the UK earlier than expected.
  • Facebook’s Ambition Collides With a Harsh Market
    The challenge for Facebook, which is worth just over half of what it was three months ago, is to convince Wall Street that it has a real plan for making money.

  • WATCH: Dr. Lucy Jones On The New Earthquake Technology
    Dr. Lucy Jones joined HuffPost Live and HuffPost Science Senior Correspondent Cara Santa Maria today to give the inside scoop on the new earthquake warning…
  • China online firms merger backed
    Shareholders of China’s online video firms, Youku and Tudou, approve their plan to merge and create the biggest online video firm in China.
  • Apple to Ramp Up 7.85" iPad Mini Production in September?
    Digitimes reports that the long-rumored 7.85″ iPad will begin volume production in September with a target of 4 million units per month.
    Supply volume of Apple’s 7.85-inch iPad is estimated to reach four million units per month starting in September in order to prepare for demand from year-end holidays, according to sources from the upstream supply chain.

    The goal is said to launch the new device before the 2012 holiday season.



    iPad Mini mockup (left) by iMore

    The timing is consistent with previous rumors that Apple would be ramping production in September. iMore reported back in May that Apple was targetting an October launch for the smaller iPad with a target price in the $200-$250 range. iMore also lumped in the iPad Mini to be announced alongside the next iPhone on the rumored September 12th media event.

    The September 12th date seems certain for an Apple media event as it has been verified by a number of publications. Apple has yet to officially announce an event, however.

    While a number of part leaks have already revealed what to expect in the next iPhone, iPad mini parts have been quite scarce. This seemingly late ramp up in production may have been intentionally timed by Apple to correspond with their launch media event in order to prevent as many leaks for this new device.


  • Bits Blog: Apple Becomes the Most Valuable Public Company Ever, With an Asterisk
    On Monday Apple became the most highly valued public company ever, but Microsoft still holds the record when its 1999 value is adjusted for inflation.

  • Media Decoder: Barnes & Noble to Offer the Nook in Britain
    The nation’s leading bookstore chain said it would announce partnerships with “leading retailers” in Britain at a later time.

  • Microsoft opens registration for Windows 8 upgrade
    Customers who purchased a Windows 7 PC after June 2 can now register for the upgrade to Windows 8 for $14.99.
  • PopCap Teases Plants vs. Zombies Sequel Coming Next Year [iOS Blog]
    NewImage
    EA/PopCap announced today that it would be releasing a sequel to Plants vs. Zombies in the Spring of 2013. The company hasn’t released any information about pricing, systems, or availability — but did issue a press release with “comments” from characters from the Plants vs. Zombies universe:

    “Spring is crullest curlie ungood time, and plantz grow dull roots,” noted an unidentified spokesperson. “So, we are meating you for brainz at yore house. No worry to skedule schedlue plan… we’re freee anytime. We’ll find you.”

    “There was a time we relished a bracing, hearty blend of zombies, in the morning,” said Sonny F. Lower, a representative of the Flora Forever Foundation. “But first, a brisk shower and some strategic pruning are required. Tomorrow is near!”

    The first release of Plants vs. Zombies is available on the Mac, iPhone, and iPad.


  • Net Neutrality Organization Accusing AT&T of Violating FCC Rules With FaceTime Data Plan Requirements
    NewImageDigital advocacy organization Public Knowledge has accused AT&T of violating FCC rules on net neutrality with its new policy regarding the use of FaceTime over Cellular. AT&T announced late last week that it will only allow users on its new Mobile Share data plans to use the new FaceTime over Cellular service in iOS 6.

    A senior staff lawyer for Public Knowledge told the New York Times that it felt AT&T was violating FCC rules that service providers not “block applications that compete with the provider’s voice or video telephony services.” John Bergmayer, lawyer for the organization, noted that “there is no technical reason why one data plan should be able to access FaceTime and another not.”

    The same argument could be made for tethering the iPhone to a laptop — however, it isn’t clear what AT&T service Public Knowledge feels FaceTime is competing with. The rule in question is designed to prevent ISP’s from blocking things like VoIP apps or Netflix that compete with their own products.

    An AT&T spokesperson issued the following statement about the allegations:

    FaceTime is available to all of our customers today over Wi-Fi, and we’re now expanding its availability even further as an added benefit of our new Mobile Share data plans.

    The FCC had no comment about the matter, and iPhone owners will not be affected by the policy until FaceTime over Cellular is enabled in iOS 6 later this year.


  • Big-Name Facebook Investor Dumps Nearly All His Shares
    NEW YORK (AP) — Peter Thiel, one of Facebook’s earliest investors and a member of its board, was among the insiders selling stock in the…
  • Evan Doherty: Do Facebook Status Updates Make Single People Feel Bad?
    After talking about it more it with my friend, I began to recognize the overwhelming number of ways Facebook can cause relationship-related frustration for a person.
  • Algorithms that can help us spend
    How smart algorithms can tempt you to spend, spend, spend
  • 7 Things You Can Buy With 1 Share Of Apple
    NEW YORK (AP) — Apple is the world’s most valuable company, ever. On Monday, its surging stock propelled the company’s value to $624 billion, beating…
  • New Taxi App Prevents Cab Crimes
    Crime fighting? There’s an app for that. Hailing a taxi after a long night of drinking is the responsible thing to do, but is it…
  • One-Off Keyboard Prototype Turns iPad Into Typewriter [iOS Blog]
    NewImage
    Austin Yang, an industrial designer current living in Edinburgh, Scotland, has created a working iPad typewriter keyboard that uses a hammer with a capacitive touch bumper to touch the iPad’s on-screen keyboard.

    Oddly, the physical keyboard doesn’t map properly to the QWERTY keyboard on the iPad, most likely because of the mechanics of the typewriter that Yang has created. This is the likely reason for the very slow typing speed in the video below.


  • Epic Patent Trial Over iPhone Tech Wraps Up
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — After three weeks of listening to technology experts, patent professionals and company executives debate the complicated legal claims of Apple Corp….
  • Secrets Learned in Apple-Samsung Trial
    The problem when companies go to trial is that the public gets to hear corporate secrets.

  • WATCH: Parody iPhone Ad Targets ‘Sad And Alone’ Amateur Food Photographers
    With rumors swirling about the iPhone 5 release, this parody commercial by comedian Adam Sacks captures everyone’s ultimate goal with using an iPhone: to take…
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